Archive for the ‘South Dakota’ category

Oral Arguments Heard in South Dakota’s Challenge to Quill

August 31, 2017

By: Jennifer Weidler Karpchuk

On August 29, oral arguments were held in South Dakota v. Wayfair, Inc. S.D., No. 28160, which challenges the state’s remote sales tax legislation, S.B. 106. 

Enacted during March 2016, S.B. 106 requires remote sellers to collect and remit tax to the state – even if they have no physical presence in the state – if they have more than $100,000 in sales or make more than 200 separate sales into South Dakota annually. The Bill was specifically crafted as a vehicle to undo the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in Quill Corp. v. North Dakota, 504 U.S. 298 (1992), which prohibits states from imposing sales and use tax collection obligations on sellers who do not have a physical presence in the state. The lower court found in favor of the taxpayers, holding that the law was unconstitutional pursuant to Quill, and the State quickly appealed to the South Dakota Supreme Court.

During oral arguments at the South Dakota Supreme Court, the State asked the court for an expeditious denial of its appeal so that it can file a writ of certiorari with the U.S. Supreme Court.  Additionally, the State requested that the court provide “a critical and important voice” urging the U.S. Supreme Court to grant cert.

Counsel for the taxpayers explained that the purposeful drafting of an unconstitutional bill in order to challenge a long-standing U.S. Supreme Court decision was unconventional and controversial. Counsel questioned whether purposefully enacting unconstitutional legislation creates bad precedent/practice.

Further, counsel for the taxpayers argued that Congress has the power to regulate interstate commerce and that Congress should decide the fate of state sales tax collection. Currently, there are four different bills pending before Congress seeking to deal with this issue, one of which we previously discussed here.

Counsel for the taxpayers also claimed that important facts were not developed and included in the record at the lower court – such as, what the projected lost revenue is to the State. Counsel for the taxpayers concluded by asking that the decision be affirmed as unconstitutional, without the court weighing in on complex policy issues.

Once the South Dakota Supreme Court issues its opinion, the parties will have 90 day to petition the U.S. Supreme Court for cert.

Crutchfield Settles; Eyes Turn to South Dakota and Alabama for Challenge to Quill

April 26, 2017

By: Jennifer Weidler Karpchuk

As our previous post explains, the U.S. Supreme Court had extended the time to file petitions for certiorari in Crutchfield Corp. v. Joseph W. Testa, Tax Commissioner of Ohio (U.S. Supreme Court Docket No. 16A774), involving the Ohio Commercial Activity Tax (“CAT”).  However, prior to the deadline, the parties agreed to forego further litigation and entered into an undisclosed settlement agreement.  As such, the Ohio Supreme Court’s decision upholding the Ohio CAT stands. See Crutchfield Corp. v. Joseph W. Testa, Tax Commissioner of Ohio, 2016 WL 6775765 (2016).

Those hoping the U.S. Supreme Court would revisit Quill through Crutchfield may be disappointed by this settlement, but should look to South Dakota and Alabama as their respective test cases challenging Quill make their way through the courts. See South Dakota v. Wayfair, Inc., et al., S.D. Cir. Ct., 6th Jud. Dist., Dkt. No. 32CIV16-000092, 03/06/2017; Newegg Inc. Notice of Appeal, Alabama Tax Tribunal.